Mature savannahs maintain stability and biodiversity by forming a complex mosaic of patches, each of which is composed of many niches.

Edit Hook

References

“Recent insights into the effects of savannah trees on understorey vegetation and soils should provide valuable clues on how to reduce the negative effects of below-ground competition in agroforestry while retaining the positive effects of trees seen in natural ecosystems. It is this opportunity for agroforests to mimic the interactions between trees and other plants in natural ecosystems that led to the recent redefinition of agroforestry (Leakey, 1996), in which different agroforestry practices are viewed as stages in the development of an agroecological succession akin to the dynamics of natural ecosystems. Over time, the increasing integration of trees into land use systems through agroforestry can be seen as the passage towards a mature agroforest of increasing integrity. Similarly, with increasing scale, the integration of various agroforestry practices into the landscape is like the formation of a complex mosaic of patches in an ecosystem, each of which is composed of many niches. These niches are occupied by different organisms, making the system ecologically stable and biologically diverse (Leakey, 1996). In systems like this, the physiological interactions between the tree and crop components of the agroecosystem are more likely to mimic those of natural ecosystems.” (Ong and Leakey 1999:112)

Journal article
Why tree-crop interactions in agroforestry appear at odds with tree-grass interactions in tropical savannahsOng, C. K.; Leakey, R. R. B.

No link available.

Journal article
Definition of agroforestry revisitedLeakey, RRB

No link available.
Edit References